Street Art for ACLU: Benefit Auction 2017

https://www.artsy.net/auction/street-art-for-aclu-benefit-auction

This site cannot take bids  you must go to Artsy at- https://www.artsy.net/auction/street-art-for-aclu-benefit-auction

ACLU of Southern California + Artsy present Street Art for ACLU: Benefit Auction 2017, featuring Shepard Fairey, Colette Miller, Knowledge Bennett, and more.

For nearly 100 years, the ACLU (American Civil Liberties Union) has been our nation’s guardian of liberty, working in a multitude of ways to preserve the individual rights and liberties that our system of governance was established to provide. In the current political climate, the importance of the ACLU’s efforts is manifold. Art, specifically street art, has long functioned as a political tool—even impacting international politics in profound ways.

We have gathered over forty significant contemporary artists—the large majority of them street artists—to raise awareness for the ACLU and generate support for the organization’s invaluable efforts.

Bidding will be open exclusively on Artsy and will close at 4:00pm PST on April 30th, 2017 (7:00pm ET).


Working primarily in the Downtown, Skid Row, and South Central neighborhoods, Bandit’s art is a fixture of Los Angeles’s streets. Coming from a background in graffiti, Bandit’s increasingly-intricate murals and stencils aim to confront his viewer with the most arresting socio-political issues of our time, with each piece poised to start a dialogue. “Street art,” in the artist’s words, “is more than just writing your name. It becomes a voice, and a responsibility.” His work is a unique expression of activism and social protest in which charged imagery is leveraged by the renegade act of its installation. Bandit has made contributions to Los Angeles’ famed Indian Alley and collaborated with many notable LA contemporaries including Plastic Jesus, WRDSMTH, Teachr, and thrashbird. Committed to work on the street, Bandit remains anonymous and is not represented by a gallery.

—Courtesy of Michael Carli

Signature: Signed

Other Works from the Auction

To view all go to https://www.artsy.net/auction/street-art-for-aclu-benefit-auction

and place your bid

Street Art for ACLU: Benefit Auction 2017 Auction closes Apr 30, 7:00 PM EDT

Bidding closes Apr 30 7:00 PM EDT

+1.646.712.8154


Bansky’s Pink Rescue Ship

Banksy spray painted the vessel with a fire extinguisher.

Banksy’s Pink Rescue Boat Saves Refugees From Mediterranean Sea – 9 & 10 NewsBanksy has bought a working refugee rescue boat (and sprayed it bright pink)
Published 28th August 2020
Banksy has financed a refugee rescue ship, which is now in operation in the Mediterranean Sea.
Credit: Louise Michel

Banksy has bought a working refugee rescue boat (and sprayed it bright pink)
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Written by
Sara Spary
Oscar Holland, CNN
The British street artist Banksy has financed and decorated a bright pink rescue boat to help save the lives of migrants and refugees crossing the Mediterranean from North Africa to Europe.
The ship, which has been named “Louise Michel” after a French anarchist, is a former French navy vessel that Banksy purchased using proceeds from his artwork, according to the new search and rescue mission.
On its website, the Louise Michel project said it aims to “uphold maritime law and rescue anyone in peril without prejudice.   More-  “https://www.cnn.com/style/article/banksy-rescue-ship-scli-intl-gbr/index.html

US dept. of Arts and Culture Coronavirus action

As COVID-19 spreads in the U.S many of us are asking: How do we connect, organize, and deepen community amidst the necessary public health practice of physical distancing? How do we combat the spread of isolation, othering, and fear? How do we learn from BIPOC, queer, and disabled communities on surviving pandemics and caring for each other? How do we stand in solidarity, mutuality, and community care, at this time of social emergency, and use what we learn toward making the systemic change?

This is a moment for us to recognize our collective interdependence and to strengthen our practices of collective care.

Tim Rollins work with KOS

https://hyperallergic.com/419070/artist-tim-rollins-obituary/

I carried the KOS video around with me from school to school hoping I could do something similar.  I remember one young KOS member did a huge collage from the broken glass he had collected from the streets of his neighborhood.  He called it something like the “night sky”  (not sure).  During the filming of this KOS doc. this young artist was shot and killed by nearby gunfire.  This horror shook me but made the whole project so real.

Artist Tim Rollins Has Died at  62

Through his more than three decades working with the collective KOS (Kids of Survival), Rollins developed a unique model for art as collaboration, activism, and pedagogy.

Tim Rollins and KOS at Lehmann Maupin in 2016 (courtesy Lehmann Maupin)
Tim Rollins and KOS at Lehmann Maupin in 2016 (courtesy Lehmann Maupin)

The artist Tim Rollins, who is best known for his work with the collective KOS (Kids of Survival), has died at age 62. He died of natural causes, according to the members of KOS. A lifelong artist and activist, Rollins developed his collaborative practice while teaching middle school art classes in the South Bronx in the early 1980s. The conceptual pieces that resulted from Rollins’s collaboration with KOS — typically, large-scale paintings on book pages — often derived meaning through the combination of the marks made and the text of the chosen books that served as backdrops, which ranged from Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884) and George Orwell’s Animal Farm (1945) to Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man (1952).

“The great Jane Addams, the Chicago social activist, had a notion of democratic aesthetics,” Rollins told Studio International’s Lilly Wei in 2014. “It’s like a community choir and people get together. Some sing like Aretha Franklin and some do not, but everyone is allowed to be in the choir and everyone’s voices are raised in unison in one common song. That’s the spirit of this group.”

Tim Rollins and KOS, "By Any Means Necessary (after Malcolm X)" (2008), matte acrylic and book pages on canvas, 72 x 72 in (courtesy Studio KOS, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong)
Tim Rollins and KOS, “By Any Means Necessary (after Malcolm X)” (2008), matte acrylic and book pages on canvas, 72 x 72 in (courtesy Studio KOS, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong)

Rollins was just 26 when he began teaching at Intermediate School 52 in the Bronx, where he developed the program that would result in KOS. Shortly thereafter, he founded the Art and Knowledge Workshop nearby, an after-school program for students passionate about art. There he and the students who became members of KOS honed the process of simultaneous working and reading that they would thereafter refer to as “jammin’,” and began incorporating pages from the texts into the artworks.

A Playful Child Looks Over the Border Wall- Thank you J.R.

Gigantic picnic at the US-Mexico border fence

( in this case- artist tries to make sense out of the absurd)

2017 Oct 17 – 00:28

On October 8th, for the last day of his huge scaffolding installation on the Mexican side of the border between the United States and Mexico, JR organized a gigantic picnic on both sides of the fence. Kikito, his family and hundreds of guests came from the US and Mexico to share a meal together. People gathered around the eyes of a Dreamer, eating the same food, sharing the same water, enjoying the same music (half of the band on each side). The wall was forgotten for a few moments …

More about the project:

The Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/
CNN: http://www.cnn.com/2017/10/10/us/border-wall-picnic-trnd/
TIME Magazine: http://time.com/4977283/artist-stages-picnic-on-us-mexico-border/

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JR in Tecate

2017 Sep 12 – 00:53

JR inaugurated last week a huge scaffolding installation on the Mexican side of the border between the United States and Mexico. The piece is best viewed from the US side of the border. An immense image of Kikito, a one year old boy from the city of Tecate, looks playfully over the infamous border wall. Kikito and his family cannot cross the border to see the artwork from the ideal vantage point.
If you are in Southern California, go and see it before October 2nd; the exact location is: bit.ly/JRinTecate

More about the project
in the New York Times : https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/07/arts/design/jr-artist-mexico-border-wall.html
and the New Yorker: https://www.newyorker.com/news/as-told-to/the-artist-jr-lifts-a-mexican-child-over-the-border-wall

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JR in Tecate

2017 Sep 12 – 00:53

JR inaugurated last week a huge scaffolding installation on the Mexican side of the border between the United States and Mexico. The piece is best viewed from the US side of the border. An immense image of Kikito, a one year old boy from the city of Tecate, looks playfully over the infamous border wall. Kikito and his family cannot cross the border to see the artwork from the ideal vantage point.
If you are in Southern California, go and see it before October 2nd; the exact location is: bit.ly/JRinTecate

More about the project
in the New York Times : https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/07/arts/design/jr-artist-mexico-border-wall.html
and the New Yorker: https://www.newyorker.com/news/as-told-to/the-artist-jr-lifts-a-mexican-child-over-the-border-wall

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NRA IS A SOCIAL WELFARE .ORG REALLY?

Ω

WHAT’S UP with IRS2015S.283?

https://www.citizensforethics.org/?s=IRS2015S.283

https://nonprofitquarterly.org/2015/02/09/politics-and-the-uses-and-abuses-of-nonprofits/

And in the wake of the never-ending saga of former IRS tax-exempt division director Lois Lerner, Senators Jeff Flake (R-AZ) and Pat Roberts (R-KS) introduced the Stop Targeting of Political Beliefs by the IRS Act of 2015, S. 283, with identical companion legislation introduced in the House of Representatives sponsored by Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) and Pete Roskam (R-IL). The bill erects a brick wall against the IRS’s efforts to clarify the definitions of political activity for 501(c)(4) social welfare organizations, essentially prohibiting the IRS from issuing any new rules and regulations during the remaining days of the Obama administration that would clarify or restrict the definition of “social welfare” for 501(c)(4)s. If passed, the legislation would be enforced through February 2017, when a new administration takes office—a none-too-subtle challenge to the purported bias of the current administration, even though, for whatever allegedly did or didn’t happen, there is no evidence that the Lerner “scandal” reached into the White House.

Art Therapist for Human Rights

Art Therapists for Human Rights ( AT4HR) is a social action group that started in January of 2017 in reaction to the announcement that AATA American Art Therapy Association would be “embracing” Karen Pence’s (kp) art therapy initiative. Not an art therapist, Kp’s number 1. initiative is to tell the world “what art therapy is”.   Because her and her vice president husband’s values, beliefs and actions stand in the way of human rights,thus standing in the way of human health,  AT4HR, a grassroots group of volunteers are actively working to keep and protect Art Therapy values alive and visible.

Art Therapist for Human Rights:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1316465618396307/files/