Street Art for ACLU: Benefit Auction 2017

https://www.artsy.net/auction/street-art-for-aclu-benefit-auction

This site cannot take bids  you must go to Artsy at- https://www.artsy.net/auction/street-art-for-aclu-benefit-auction

ACLU of Southern California + Artsy present Street Art for ACLU: Benefit Auction 2017, featuring Shepard Fairey, Colette Miller, Knowledge Bennett, and more.

For nearly 100 years, the ACLU (American Civil Liberties Union) has been our nation’s guardian of liberty, working in a multitude of ways to preserve the individual rights and liberties that our system of governance was established to provide. In the current political climate, the importance of the ACLU’s efforts is manifold. Art, specifically street art, has long functioned as a political tool—even impacting international politics in profound ways.

We have gathered over forty significant contemporary artists—the large majority of them street artists—to raise awareness for the ACLU and generate support for the organization’s invaluable efforts.

Bidding will be open exclusively on Artsy and will close at 4:00pm PST on April 30th, 2017 (7:00pm ET).


Working primarily in the Downtown, Skid Row, and South Central neighborhoods, Bandit’s art is a fixture of Los Angeles’s streets. Coming from a background in graffiti, Bandit’s increasingly-intricate murals and stencils aim to confront his viewer with the most arresting socio-political issues of our time, with each piece poised to start a dialogue. “Street art,” in the artist’s words, “is more than just writing your name. It becomes a voice, and a responsibility.” His work is a unique expression of activism and social protest in which charged imagery is leveraged by the renegade act of its installation. Bandit has made contributions to Los Angeles’ famed Indian Alley and collaborated with many notable LA contemporaries including Plastic Jesus, WRDSMTH, Teachr, and thrashbird. Committed to work on the street, Bandit remains anonymous and is not represented by a gallery.

—Courtesy of Michael Carli

Signature: Signed

Other Works from the Auction

To view all go to https://www.artsy.net/auction/street-art-for-aclu-benefit-auction

and place your bid

Street Art for ACLU: Benefit Auction 2017 Auction closes Apr 30, 7:00 PM EDT

Bidding closes Apr 30 7:00 PM EDT

+1.646.712.8154


Advertisements

Tim Rollins work with KOS

https://hyperallergic.com/419070/artist-tim-rollins-obituary/

I carried the KOS video around with me from school to school hoping I could do something similar.  I remember one young KOS member did a huge collage from the broken glass he had collected from the streets of his neighborhood.  He called it something like the “night sky”  (not sure).  During the filming of this KOS doc. this young artist was shot and killed by nearby gunfire.  This horror shook me but made the whole project so real.

Artist Tim Rollins Has Died at  62

Through his more than three decades working with the collective KOS (Kids of Survival), Rollins developed a unique model for art as collaboration, activism, and pedagogy.

Tim Rollins and KOS at Lehmann Maupin in 2016 (courtesy Lehmann Maupin)
Tim Rollins and KOS at Lehmann Maupin in 2016 (courtesy Lehmann Maupin)

The artist Tim Rollins, who is best known for his work with the collective KOS (Kids of Survival), has died at age 62. He died of natural causes, according to the members of KOS. A lifelong artist and activist, Rollins developed his collaborative practice while teaching middle school art classes in the South Bronx in the early 1980s. The conceptual pieces that resulted from Rollins’s collaboration with KOS — typically, large-scale paintings on book pages — often derived meaning through the combination of the marks made and the text of the chosen books that served as backdrops, which ranged from Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884) and George Orwell’s Animal Farm (1945) to Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man (1952).

“The great Jane Addams, the Chicago social activist, had a notion of democratic aesthetics,” Rollins told Studio International’s Lilly Wei in 2014. “It’s like a community choir and people get together. Some sing like Aretha Franklin and some do not, but everyone is allowed to be in the choir and everyone’s voices are raised in unison in one common song. That’s the spirit of this group.”

Tim Rollins and KOS, "By Any Means Necessary (after Malcolm X)" (2008), matte acrylic and book pages on canvas, 72 x 72 in (courtesy Studio KOS, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong)
Tim Rollins and KOS, “By Any Means Necessary (after Malcolm X)” (2008), matte acrylic and book pages on canvas, 72 x 72 in (courtesy Studio KOS, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong)

Rollins was just 26 when he began teaching at Intermediate School 52 in the Bronx, where he developed the program that would result in KOS. Shortly thereafter, he founded the Art and Knowledge Workshop nearby, an after-school program for students passionate about art. There he and the students who became members of KOS honed the process of simultaneous working and reading that they would thereafter refer to as “jammin’,” and began incorporating pages from the texts into the artworks.

A Playful Child Looks Over the Border Wall- Thank you J.R.

Gigantic picnic at the US-Mexico border fence

( in this case- artist tries to make sense out of the absurd)

2017 Oct 17 – 00:28

On October 8th, for the last day of his huge scaffolding installation on the Mexican side of the border between the United States and Mexico, JR organized a gigantic picnic on both sides of the fence. Kikito, his family and hundreds of guests came from the US and Mexico to share a meal together. People gathered around the eyes of a Dreamer, eating the same food, sharing the same water, enjoying the same music (half of the band on each side). The wall was forgotten for a few moments …

More about the project:

The Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/
CNN: http://www.cnn.com/2017/10/10/us/border-wall-picnic-trnd/
TIME Magazine: http://time.com/4977283/artist-stages-picnic-on-us-mexico-border/

Share/Save

JR in Tecate

2017 Sep 12 – 00:53

JR inaugurated last week a huge scaffolding installation on the Mexican side of the border between the United States and Mexico. The piece is best viewed from the US side of the border. An immense image of Kikito, a one year old boy from the city of Tecate, looks playfully over the infamous border wall. Kikito and his family cannot cross the border to see the artwork from the ideal vantage point.
If you are in Southern California, go and see it before October 2nd; the exact location is: bit.ly/JRinTecate

More about the project
in the New York Times : https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/07/arts/design/jr-artist-mexico-border-wall.html
and the New Yorker: https://www.newyorker.com/news/as-told-to/the-artist-jr-lifts-a-mexican-child-over-the-border-wall

Share/Save

JR in Tecate

2017 Sep 12 – 00:53

JR inaugurated last week a huge scaffolding installation on the Mexican side of the border between the United States and Mexico. The piece is best viewed from the US side of the border. An immense image of Kikito, a one year old boy from the city of Tecate, looks playfully over the infamous border wall. Kikito and his family cannot cross the border to see the artwork from the ideal vantage point.
If you are in Southern California, go and see it before October 2nd; the exact location is: bit.ly/JRinTecate

More about the project
in the New York Times : https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/07/arts/design/jr-artist-mexico-border-wall.html
and the New Yorker: https://www.newyorker.com/news/as-told-to/the-artist-jr-lifts-a-mexican-child-over-the-border-wall

Share/Save

NRA IS A SOCIAL WELFARE .ORG REALLY?

Ω

WHAT’S UP with IRS2015S.283?

https://www.citizensforethics.org/?s=IRS2015S.283

https://nonprofitquarterly.org/2015/02/09/politics-and-the-uses-and-abuses-of-nonprofits/

And in the wake of the never-ending saga of former IRS tax-exempt division director Lois Lerner, Senators Jeff Flake (R-AZ) and Pat Roberts (R-KS) introduced the Stop Targeting of Political Beliefs by the IRS Act of 2015, S. 283, with identical companion legislation introduced in the House of Representatives sponsored by Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) and Pete Roskam (R-IL). The bill erects a brick wall against the IRS’s efforts to clarify the definitions of political activity for 501(c)(4) social welfare organizations, essentially prohibiting the IRS from issuing any new rules and regulations during the remaining days of the Obama administration that would clarify or restrict the definition of “social welfare” for 501(c)(4)s. If passed, the legislation would be enforced through February 2017, when a new administration takes office—a none-too-subtle challenge to the purported bias of the current administration, even though, for whatever allegedly did or didn’t happen, there is no evidence that the Lerner “scandal” reached into the White House.

Art Therapist for Human Rights

Art Therapists for Human Rights ( AT4HR) is a social action group that started in January of 2017 in reaction to the announcement that AATA American Art Therapy Association would be “embracing” Karen Pence’s (kp) art therapy initiative. Not an art therapist, Kp’s number 1. initiative is to tell the world “what art therapy is”.   Because her and her vice president husband’s values, beliefs and actions stand in the way of human rights,thus standing in the way of human health,  AT4HR, a grassroots group of volunteers are actively working to keep and protect Art Therapy values alive and visible.

Art Therapist for Human Rights:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1316465618396307/files/

 

The Role Museums Play in Social Activism

“Museums taking an activist stance is not new”

On July 26, the Brooklyn Museum opened The Legacy of Lynching: Confronting Racial Terror in America. This exhibition, created in partnership with the Equal Justice Initiative (EJI) and Google, “seeks to spark an honest conversation about the legacy of racial injustice in America today.” EJI is a nonprofit in Montgomery, Alabama, that works to address racial and social injustices and to end mass incarceration. The exhibition includes artists such as Kara Walker, Rashid Johnson, and Theaster Gates. This is one of many recent examples of museums that have taken an “art for social change” stance in their programming.

Museums taking an activist stance is not new—in fact, they have been doing so for many years. Sometimes museums take a stance in a subtle way, such as when natural history museums included The Couple in a Cage: Two Amerindians Visit the West in 1992-93. In this work, artists Coco Fusco and Guillermo Gómez-Peña embodied fictional characters or “Amerindians” to make visible the abuse and exploitation inflicted on indigenous American Indians by European invaders. While these museums did not make an overt political statement on their intentions of criticizing the United States’ origin story, it was also a very important moment for including works of art that did not fit into the status quo. In more recent history, museums have become increasingly vocal in their ability to make political statements—for example, the Museum of Modern Art reacting to President Trump’s travel ban of early 2017.

This raises the questions: Should museums be seen as a place of dialogue for social change? Is it their responsibility to do so?

Recently, articles have come out addressing this topic—for example, MuseumNext conducted a survey asking “Should museums be activists?” Among the responses, data showed that “younger audiences respond very positively to the idea of museums taking a stand.”

In Georgia, cultural institutions responded to the threat of cuts to the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities by creating a postcard campaign with the hashtag #GAArtsFuture. This initiative began with two museums and one community-based arts organization: the High Museum of Art, Spelman College Museum of Fine Art, and WonderRoot.

In many instances, even if a museum is unable to take a political or social stand for whatever reason, museum educational programming can still address the needs of the community. Last year at the High Museum, we began partnering with the Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice on providing guided tours for imprisoned students from various detention centers in the state. At the end of the year, we had an exhibition of the students’ work and a reception with the students, their parole officers, the students’ family, caregivers, and friends. We hope to grow the program to be more substantial and far-reaching, for more students, in the upcoming school year.

Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice exhibition at the High Museum of Art.Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice exhibition at the High Museum of Art.

Minneapolis Museum of Art took on the question “How can the museum be used as a site for social action?” and created a three-year strategic plan called Museum as Site for Social Action (MASS Action). The three years end in October, when they will unveil a toolkit of resources for museums and social action including educational programming practices.

Evaluation, documentation, and public response will determine the efficacy and sustainability of these programs. The responsibility of museums and cultural institutions to provide for a community, especially the next generation, is important, albeit complicated.

The choice of museums to take a stand is unique to each institution, and it’s complicated, layered, and specific to the geographical location and political climate of the region. In the meantime, artists will continue to create works that question our existence and boundaries; be responsive to the emotional, social, political, and religious world around them; and ask the important questions that move us all forward as aware global citizens. Museums and cultural institutions that support contemporary artists will continue to support them, whether through curatorial or educational programming. Supporting artists will also mean empowering youth voices through museum settings and allowing young artists to continue to push boundaries, respond to the world around them in an empathetic and critical way, and ask important questions for the rest of us to listen.

Kate McLeod is a member of Americans for the Arts.