The Artist Visual and Written Journal —- artist: Emiliano Ponzi–ITALY

The Post has enlisted Emiliano Ponzi to draw and write about daily life in Milan during the coronavirus outbreak. As of March 28, Italy has been hit especially hard, with more than 10,000 deaths — the most in the world.

 

 

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2020/03/14/an-illustrated-look-italy-now/?arc404=true

https://usdac.us/ US Dept of ARTS and Culture

US dept.  but not part of the Government  – This is So Clever – Please visit- this is an amazing resource site.

Just one example:

 

Join us for the 2020 People’s State of the Union

in Partnership with the Poor People’s Campaign

Poor-People-Campaign.jpg

March 20-April 20, 2020

US dept. of Arts and Culture Coronavirus action

As COVID-19 spreads in the U.S many of us are asking: How do we connect, organize, and deepen community amidst the necessary public health practice of physical distancing? How do we combat the spread of isolation, othering, and fear? How do we learn from BIPOC, queer, and disabled communities on surviving pandemics and caring for each other? How do we stand in solidarity, mutuality, and community care, at this time of social emergency, and use what we learn toward making the systemic change?

This is a moment for us to recognize our collective interdependence and to strengthen our practices of collective care.

Tim Rollins work with KOS

https://hyperallergic.com/419070/artist-tim-rollins-obituary/

I carried the KOS video around with me from school to school hoping I could do something similar.  I remember one young KOS member did a huge collage from the broken glass he had collected from the streets of his neighborhood.  He called it something like the “night sky”  (not sure).  During the filming of this KOS doc. this young artist was shot and killed by nearby gunfire.  This horror shook me but made the whole project so real.

Artist Tim Rollins Has Died at  62

Through his more than three decades working with the collective KOS (Kids of Survival), Rollins developed a unique model for art as collaboration, activism, and pedagogy.

Tim Rollins and KOS at Lehmann Maupin in 2016 (courtesy Lehmann Maupin)
Tim Rollins and KOS at Lehmann Maupin in 2016 (courtesy Lehmann Maupin)

The artist Tim Rollins, who is best known for his work with the collective KOS (Kids of Survival), has died at age 62. He died of natural causes, according to the members of KOS. A lifelong artist and activist, Rollins developed his collaborative practice while teaching middle school art classes in the South Bronx in the early 1980s. The conceptual pieces that resulted from Rollins’s collaboration with KOS — typically, large-scale paintings on book pages — often derived meaning through the combination of the marks made and the text of the chosen books that served as backdrops, which ranged from Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884) and George Orwell’s Animal Farm (1945) to Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man (1952).

“The great Jane Addams, the Chicago social activist, had a notion of democratic aesthetics,” Rollins told Studio International’s Lilly Wei in 2014. “It’s like a community choir and people get together. Some sing like Aretha Franklin and some do not, but everyone is allowed to be in the choir and everyone’s voices are raised in unison in one common song. That’s the spirit of this group.”

Tim Rollins and KOS, "By Any Means Necessary (after Malcolm X)" (2008), matte acrylic and book pages on canvas, 72 x 72 in (courtesy Studio KOS, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong)
Tim Rollins and KOS, “By Any Means Necessary (after Malcolm X)” (2008), matte acrylic and book pages on canvas, 72 x 72 in (courtesy Studio KOS, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong)

Rollins was just 26 when he began teaching at Intermediate School 52 in the Bronx, where he developed the program that would result in KOS. Shortly thereafter, he founded the Art and Knowledge Workshop nearby, an after-school program for students passionate about art. There he and the students who became members of KOS honed the process of simultaneous working and reading that they would thereafter refer to as “jammin’,” and began incorporating pages from the texts into the artworks.

A Playful Child Looks Over the Border Wall- Thank you J.R.

Gigantic picnic at the US-Mexico border fence

( in this case- artist tries to make sense out of the absurd)

2017 Oct 17 – 00:28

On October 8th, for the last day of his huge scaffolding installation on the Mexican side of the border between the United States and Mexico, JR organized a gigantic picnic on both sides of the fence. Kikito, his family and hundreds of guests came from the US and Mexico to share a meal together. People gathered around the eyes of a Dreamer, eating the same food, sharing the same water, enjoying the same music (half of the band on each side). The wall was forgotten for a few moments …

More about the project:

The Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/
CNN: http://www.cnn.com/2017/10/10/us/border-wall-picnic-trnd/
TIME Magazine: http://time.com/4977283/artist-stages-picnic-on-us-mexico-border/

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JR in Tecate

2017 Sep 12 – 00:53

JR inaugurated last week a huge scaffolding installation on the Mexican side of the border between the United States and Mexico. The piece is best viewed from the US side of the border. An immense image of Kikito, a one year old boy from the city of Tecate, looks playfully over the infamous border wall. Kikito and his family cannot cross the border to see the artwork from the ideal vantage point.
If you are in Southern California, go and see it before October 2nd; the exact location is: bit.ly/JRinTecate

More about the project
in the New York Times : https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/07/arts/design/jr-artist-mexico-border-wall.html
and the New Yorker: https://www.newyorker.com/news/as-told-to/the-artist-jr-lifts-a-mexican-child-over-the-border-wall

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JR in Tecate

2017 Sep 12 – 00:53

JR inaugurated last week a huge scaffolding installation on the Mexican side of the border between the United States and Mexico. The piece is best viewed from the US side of the border. An immense image of Kikito, a one year old boy from the city of Tecate, looks playfully over the infamous border wall. Kikito and his family cannot cross the border to see the artwork from the ideal vantage point.
If you are in Southern California, go and see it before October 2nd; the exact location is: bit.ly/JRinTecate

More about the project
in the New York Times : https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/07/arts/design/jr-artist-mexico-border-wall.html
and the New Yorker: https://www.newyorker.com/news/as-told-to/the-artist-jr-lifts-a-mexican-child-over-the-border-wall

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NRA IS A SOCIAL WELFARE .ORG REALLY?

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WHAT’S UP with IRS2015S.283?

https://www.citizensforethics.org/?s=IRS2015S.283

https://nonprofitquarterly.org/2015/02/09/politics-and-the-uses-and-abuses-of-nonprofits/

And in the wake of the never-ending saga of former IRS tax-exempt division director Lois Lerner, Senators Jeff Flake (R-AZ) and Pat Roberts (R-KS) introduced the Stop Targeting of Political Beliefs by the IRS Act of 2015, S. 283, with identical companion legislation introduced in the House of Representatives sponsored by Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) and Pete Roskam (R-IL). The bill erects a brick wall against the IRS’s efforts to clarify the definitions of political activity for 501(c)(4) social welfare organizations, essentially prohibiting the IRS from issuing any new rules and regulations during the remaining days of the Obama administration that would clarify or restrict the definition of “social welfare” for 501(c)(4)s. If passed, the legislation would be enforced through February 2017, when a new administration takes office—a none-too-subtle challenge to the purported bias of the current administration, even though, for whatever allegedly did or didn’t happen, there is no evidence that the Lerner “scandal” reached into the White House.